From the public sector, to diverse industries to law firms and education – no sector will escape the transformation of the work environment. Until 2035, the oldest working generation will be the largest and the youngest – the smallest, but after that: things will change. Millennials have a fresh look on life and don’t particularly like outdated corporate cultures. Why and what can you do as an organization to adapt to the changing times? Discover now what you can do to create a strong company (or maybe brand?) culture.

Millennial research

Much is said and written about how to deal with the millennial target group. However, until recently, concrete and valid research was quite lacking. Our mission is to help employers translate those abstract millennial wishes such as ‘autonomy’ and ‘freedom’ or ‘meaningful work’ tangible, daily practice. An joint initiative of Appical, Careerwise, generation- and millennial-experts Aart Bontekoning, Jasper Scholten en Bart Hessing.

Last year, we published the whitepaper ‘The millennial busting the myth’. Click here to download it. Soon we will publish a follow-up with concrete examples from the millennial research group itself.

What do millennials think?

We already know that millennials attribute great importance to (personal) development. Many employers also know this, and are often willing to offer millennials a  platform for development. The question remains however, what form of development does a millennial want?

When it comes to development on the work floor, one naturally thinks of professional development. But as it turns out, 64% of the millennials out of our research group indicate that for them, personal development is the most important form of development. Where only 24% mention professional development as the most important. Personal development can be widely interpreted, just as some of the most popular answers: “Developing my talents”, “Operating from my strength” and “Investigate what I really want”. While the idea is widely shared, the form of the desired personal development differs greatly between millenials.

The form of professional development differs precisely per sector. In government and healthcare, it is mainly getting better in a profession is considered important. The business community, though, feels that ”working towards a next step in the career” and ”working together with professionals you can learn a lot from” is more important.

Not professional, but personal development turns out to be key for millennials!

How do I act on this as an organization? Hereby a couple of tips!

Why do you have to invest in millennials right now? What do millennials experience as energy generators and what is not? In the following whitepaper we take a deep-dive into development, meaningful work, hierarchy, bureaucracy, autonomy, corporate culture, expectation management and good leadership do’s and don’ts. Our key points for you:

  • Give millennials frameworks, but avoid rules, hierarchies and pointless meetings
  • Millennials need continuous feedback (feel responsible about what?)
  • They want to make an impact and strive for perfection
  • Promoting high working energy and authenticity in the workplace should be the greatest focus of an organizations.

A number of tips for now!

  • Look critically at internal processes and examine how current employees experience their work.
  • During the onboarding, start discussing growth path early. Focus on collaboration and equality.
  • Give guidance in an (informal) way.
  • Ask millennials what they would change if they were CEO for a week.

Do you want to be the first to get started with all our golden tips? Keep an eye on our social media or pre-register for our new whitepaperYou’ll be the first to receive it!