Does onboarding have priority within your organization? You know that it is an important part of HR and you are looking for good examples. To start improving the way your business approaches onboarding you will need to get buy-in from key stakeholders, and this will require you to make a business case. We’re happy to help you out.

There are three things to remember when writing a onboarding business case

  1. We know that effective onboarding is crucial to business success as it is the way we support each person joining our organisation in becoming settled and productive employees. It also provides the first experience of the type of company we are to work for, so goes a long way to determining engagement at an early stage. Know the stakeholders you want to influence and write it in a way that they will understand. This means focusing on their priorities and not purely on your interests. Read more on stakeholders right here.
  2. Any business case should be brief and to the point, interesting and concise. If you take too long to explain your proposals a reader might lose interest. Describe your vision for onboarding after the process has changed without speculating or using HR jargon.
  3. Demonstrate the value and benefits that a new approach to onboarding will bring to the business. This is the key part and needs to demonstrate the real value to business performance, rather than a best practice ’nice to have’ process.

We know that effective onboarding is crucial to business success as it is the way we support each person joining our organisation in becoming settled and productive employees. It also provides the first experience of the type of company we are to work for, so goes a long way to determining engagement at an early stage.

Key areas business case

The best way to start creating a business case is to look at 4 of the key areas that concern every organisation, and demonstrate the value that onboarding can bring through performance improvement.

REPUTATION

  • Does your business have a problem attracting new hires, or converting them once an offer is made? It could be that your external reputation needs improving. Have you checked your reviews on sites like Glassdoor and Indeed? Make sure that stakeholders know what is being said about you.
  • What feedback do you get from exit interviews when someone leaves? It will be important to know why people become unsettled and be able to show how this can be improved from the start of their relationship with the business.

RETENTION

  • What proportion of new employees join your business and leave within the 6 months, or year? The usual reasons why this happens – the job not being what was expected, dissatisfaction with the culture or a poor relationship with colleagues and/or managers – are all fixable by good onboarding.
  • Attrition costs businesses. Existing employees become unsettled and productivity suffers. Make sure your business case shows how much this might be costing and how onboarding can save this amount.

ENGAGEMENT

  • What do your engagement survey show? How happy are your employees and what are the negatives that they mention? Disengaged workers also cost businesses in weaker output, more time taken off through sickness and the likelihood that their dissatisfaction will affect other colleagues.
  • Employees who are made to feel welcome, empowered and supported to do their jobs well, and have a clear understanding of how to be successful within the organisation, are much more likely to be engaged. So demonstrate how an improved approach to onboarding can fix this from the start.

PERFORMANCE AND WELLBEING

  • This is a win-win. Happier, healthier employees are more likely to be productive, and productive employees are more likely to be happier as they will have less worries about their work and performance. If your business is struggling, and managers are having to conduct more performance reviews than they would like, then effective onboarding can make a big impact.
  • If employees know more about their roles, and the vision and values if their new employer from their start, they will be less anxious about making a good impression. Ongoing feedback during the early weeks and months can feed in to an approach to performance management based on continuous feedback and not a series of historic annual reviews. This will help each new hire to better understand their performance and make a stronger contribution.

 

The best business cases focus on showing how the benefits and value to the business are outweighed by any costs or short term change. Staring with these key business areas will help shape a business case that persuades stakeholders.

Are you looking for a good onboarding solution? We are happy to help you with your business case. Our onboarding specialists are happy to help you!